Must review GMAT Articles:GMAT examine Plan: The Best method to research for the GMAT how to examine for the GMAT While working how to Score High ~ above GMAT Verbal


*


*

*

Re: which of the following explains the set of all feasible values the the<#permalink>26 Sep 2019, 22:10
n/k need to be such that it lies midway between consecutive integers.

You are watching: Which of the following describes

Best means to deal with a inquiry - imagine what the is trying come say.Consecutive integers are 1,2,3...midway would be 1.5, 2.5 etc...Odd numbers divided by what k would give us this value? - 2 which is all also prime numbers.
*

*

Re: which of the following defines the collection of all possible values the the<#permalink>26 Sep 2019, 23:09
Re: i beg your pardon of the following describes the collection of all possible values of the<#permalink>27 Sep 2019, 22:46
There space 2 things you require to capture here1. The collection of all possible values the the positive integer k2. The value of n/k is midway in between consecutive integersWhen will the value of n/k constantly be midway between something? or let"s rephrase it, midway= half so, basically when will n/k be half? once k=2. Appears pretty straightforward currently doesn"t itNow, simply look for an choice that provides you k=2
Re: i m sorry of the following explains the set of all possible values that the<#permalink>04 Oct 2019, 00:06
Which of the following defines the set of all feasible values the the<#permalink>25 Oct 2019, 14:00
Which of the following explains the set of all feasible values that the confident integer k together that, because that each optimistic odd creature n, the value of n/k is midway in between consecutive integers?There space three components to this question: 1) set of all possible values of confident integer K:. K>0 and also integer - therefore k=1 k=2 k=3 etc. 2) Each hopeful odd integer n:. N= 1, 3, 5, ...3) the value of n/k is midway between consecutive integersconsecutive integers 0,1,2,3,4,...:.n/k to it is in midway method n/k would need to be 1/2, 1.5, 2.5 which are midpoints of consecutive integers. The only value the K that will certainly fulfill problem 3 is if k=2. :. If n=1 n/k= 1/2; n=3 n/k=3/2 i.e 1.5 and also so onAnd 2 is the only even prime number. Hence, D. Expect this helps.

See more: Miranda Frank The Path (Tv Series), The Path A Homecoming (Tv Episode 2016)


Which the the following defines the collection of all feasible values the the<#permalink>10 Jun 2020, 02:41
What about, because that example, if n = 7 and k = 14, then the an outcome of n/k is quiet midway in between consecutive integers (0 and 1).k does not need to be 2. It might be 2, 6, 10, 14, 18, 22...Any help?
Re: i m sorry of the following describes the collection of all feasible values of the<#permalink>28 Jul 2020, 10:19